Harley-Davidson recall: 'Do not ride' some '14 bikes

Harley-Davidson recalls more than 29,000 touring motorcycles built between May and October of this year. Problems with a hydraulic clutch, which could make it difficult to stop or slow the bikes, prompted the Harley-Davidson recall.  

Sara Stathas/Reuters/File
Tens of thousands of Harley- Davidson enthusiasts from all corners of the globe made the pilgrimage to Milwaukee for the motorcycle maker's 110th anniversary celebration over Labor Day weekend. A new Harley-Davidson recall involves 25,185 touring motorcycles and 3,861 Custom Vehicle Operations and Trikes built this year.

U.S. motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson Inc said on Wednesday it is voluntarily recalling more than 29,000 of its 2014 touring motorcycles because of a problem with their hydraulic clutch system.

Recalled models include 25,185 touring motorcycles and 3,861 Custom Vehicle Operations and Trikes built between May 3 and Oct. 14, 2013.

The recalls include a "Do Not Ride" notice to owners and a "Do Not Deliver" notice to Harley-Davidson dealers until the motorcycle is fixed.

"Some of these motorcycles may exhibit a condition in which the hydraulic clutch system may lose the ability to generate enough lift to disengage the clutch," the Milwaukee-based company said in a statement.

Harley-Davidson said it is proceeding with the recalls consistent with National Highway Transportation Safety Administration's process, though the U.S. government body is closed due to the partial government shutdown.

Harley-Davidson said if the clutch does not disengage as intended, the rider may have difficulty slowing or stopping the motorcycle, which could result in an accident. "The repairs have been identified and should take less than one hour."

Harley-Davidson recalled more than 300,000 motorcycles worldwide in 2011 due to problems with the rear brake light switch.

Harley-Davidson said in July that it expects to ship 259,000 to 264,000 motorcycles to dealers worldwide in 2013, up from 247,625 in 2012.

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