Schindler's list verification letter sells for $122,000

Schlindler's list began with a letter Oskar Schindler signed that paved the way for the rescue of more than 1,000 Jewish factory workers. The letter was sold at auction Wednesday for $122,000.

A collection of documents from World War II industrialist Oskar Schindler, including a letter he signed that paved the way for the rescue of more than 1,000 Jewish factory workers, has fetched more than $122,000 at an online auction.

The letter, dated Aug. 22, 1944, describes permission to move Schindler's enamelware factory and its workers from Krakow, Poland, to Czechoslovakia. Historians say that move allowed him to carry out the rescue chronicled in the movie "Schindler's List."

It's believed to be the first known document confirming the move.

The letter was offered along with a worker medical transfer document by RR Auction in Amherst, N.H. The auction, which ended Wednesday, also offered the Krakow factory blueprints.

RR Auction says one person, who wishes to remain anonymous, purchased all of the documents.

Last month, one of four original copies of Schindler's famous list was placed on eBay for auction at $3 million. The list got no bids. 

The list that was up for auction contains 801 male names and is dated April 8, 1945, ABC News reported:

David Crowe, a Holocaust historian and the author of the book, "Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities, and the True Story Behind the List," said that the date of the list may be one reason it did not receive any bids.

Crowe said that the film depicted the first two lists ever created, in the fall of 1944. He only views those lists as the "lists of life," as they are called in the film. The subsequent lists -- including this one -- were simply updates of the original lists. They are not worth $3 million, he said.

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