Michael Vick deal: He'll give up $1M to stay in Philly

Michael Vick's deal with the Eagles cuts his package by $1 million dollars, but the deal gives him a chance to reclaim his position as starting quarterback. Prior to the deal, many had speculated that the Philadelphia Eagles would drop Michael Vick from their roster.

Matt Rourke / AP / File
Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick, center, drops back to pass as quarterbacks Trent Edwards, left, and Nick Foles look on during NFL football practices at the team's facility in Philadelphia last September. Vick, who was slated to earn almost $16 million next season, has agreed to a restructured deal with the Eagles.

In Michael Vick's new deal, he takes a significant pay cut to stay with the Philadelphia Eagles and compete for a starting job.

The four-time Pro Bowl quarterback agreed Monday to a restructured three-year contract with the Eagles, just two seasons after signing a $100 million extension that included $35.5 million in guaranteed money. The new deal is essentially for one year, however.

A source familiar with the contract said Vick could earn up to $10 million in 2013 if he meets all his performance incentives, and the team will void the remaining two years on March 15. That person spoke on condition of anonymity because the terms haven't been released.

Vick was slated to earn about $16 million next season, including a $3 million roster bonus. He lost his starting job to rookie Nick Foles last season, but new coach Chip Kelly will give him a chance to win it back.

"I am grateful and proud to be a Philadelphia Eagle," Vick wrote on Twitter. "My heart is in Philly and this community is important to me."

Vick had a breakout year in 2010, leading the Eagles to the NFC East title, winning The Associated Press Comeback Player of the Year award and starting in the Pro Bowl. But he's battled injuries and inconsistency the last two years.

"What I look at is skillset first and foremost," Kelly said. "What he can do, how he can throw the football, how he can beat people with his feet. There are a lot of different factors he has. And you have to look at the landscape for other quarterbacks. I guess the best way I can put this is I agree there is a change of scenery going on here. For Michael Vick, there is a change of scenery, but not a change of address."

Vick has missed 11 games because of injuries over the last three seasons. He sustained a concussion in Week 10 last year and Reid decided to let Foles play the rest of the way because the Eagles were in last place. They finished 4-12.

Vick returned to start the season finale against the New York Giants because Foles was hurt. He finished the year with 2,362 yards passing, 12 touchdowns and 10 interceptions, and also lost five fumbles.

A former No. 1 overall pick by Atlanta, Vick was signed by Philadelphia in 2009 after missing two years because he was in federal prison for running a dog fighting ring.

Follow Rob Maaddi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobMaaddi

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