Anchors resign on air, blaming management

Anchors resign on air at end of their newscast Tuesday in Bangor, Maine. Anchors not specific about why they resign on air, later citing frustration with management (which once prohibited staff from reporting on global warming).

Kevin Bennett/The Bangor Daily News/AP/File
WVII covered last month's US Senate candidates debate in Bangor, Maine, but the station itself makes the news on Tuesday as two of its anchors resign on air.

Two news co-anchors for a Maine television station shocked viewers and colleagues by quitting on the air, later citing frustration with their management.

Cindy Michaels and Tony Consiglio announced their resignations at the end of Tuesday's 6 p.m. newscast on WVII.

The two didn't give specific reasons on the air for their sudden departure. Consiglio said that while they enjoyed reporting the news, "some recent developments have come to our attention, though, and departing together is the best alternative we can take."

Michaels said she and Consiglio "are very sorry for having to say goodbye for now, but we'll still be around." She plans to pursue a writing career and paint, and Consiglio said he would continue his career "in a different capacity."

Their boss said Wednesday they had been on their way out the door, anyway. He said he was not surprised by the action they took.

"Sometimes people leave before they're officially told to leave," said Mike Palmer, station vice president and general manager. He declined to discuss issues that may have caused disagreements but said, "There are things that they know."

The Associated Press left messages with Michaels and Consiglio. Both told the Bangor Daily News after their last newscast that they were frustrated with management and cited a dispute over journalistic practices.

Asked about reaction from viewers in the small market served by WVII, an ABC affiliate, Palmer said, "I have not heard from a single viewer."

But he said he had received about 20 applications for their jobs after posting them Tuesday night on an industry website.

"I've had people from all over the country send resumes and audition reels," Palmer said.

WVII and another station Palmer manages, Fox affiliate WFVX, have made headlines before. In 2006, The New York Times reported that Palmer prohibited his staff from doing stories on global warming.

Consiglio, 28, started with WVII as a sports reporter in April 2006. Michaels, 46, was the news director and spent six years at the station.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Anchors resign on air, blaming management
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2012/1121/Anchors-resign-on-air-blaming-management
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe