Lady Gaga donates $1 million to Sandy relief

Lady Gaga donates $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affected by Superstorm Sandy, the pop star posted on her blog. Born and raised in New York, Lady Gaga donates the $1 million on behalf of her mother and sister. 

Luca Bruno/AP/File
Lady Gaga arrives at the Versace in Milan, Italy in this file photo taken last month. The pop star and New York native will donate $1 million to the Red Cross to aid victims of superstorm Sandy.

Lady Gaga is donating $1 million to the Red Cross to aid those affected by Superstorm Sandy.

The New York-born singer posted on her blog Wednesday that she is pledging the money on behalf of her parents and sister. She also said she "would not be the woman or artist that I am today" if it weren't for places like the Lower Eastside, Harlem, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

She writes: "Thank you for helping me build my spirit. I will now help you rebuild yours."

Superstorm Sandy made landfall more than a week ago, killing many of its more than 100 victims in New York City and New Jersey and leaving millions without power.

Lady Gaga added that New York is a place full of "relentless ambition."

Lady Gaga is not alone in her Sandy giving. The Marshall Tucker Band is using its tour truck to collect donations for victims of superstorm Sandy.

The truck was parking outside of the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium in Spartanburg, S.C., on Thursday from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. The band will be there to thank people. Additional trucks will be stationed in Anderson and Chesnee, S.C. In a statement, lead singer Doug Gray says the band has received support from people in the northeast for over 40 years and feels their pain "on a personal level."

The Southern rock band is primarily looking to collect coats and blankets. They encourage people to make cash donations to the American Red Cross.

More than a week ago, a slew of pop singers and celebrities raised $23 million in a telethon to help Sandy victims.

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