Mazda CX-7 from 2007-2012 recalled for corrosion problem

Mazda is recalling more than 190,000 Mazda CX-7 crossovers from model years 2007 to 2012. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that water can enter the CX-7's front suspension ball joint fittings, which can cause corrosion.

Gene J. Puskar/AP/File
The Mazda logo on a sign at the 2013 Pittsburgh Auto Show, in Pittsburgh. Mazda is recalling more than 190,000 Mazda CX-7 crossovers from model years 2007 to 2012.

Mazda is recalling more than 190,000 Mazda CX-7 crossovers from model years 2007 to 2012. Like the Toyota and Lexus recall we wrote about earlier, the Mazda recall stems from corrosion that can affect a vehicle's suspension.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that water can enter the CX-7's front suspension ball joint fittings. That in itself might not sound too bad, but if the water in question contains contaminants--like, say, the salt you find on slushy, snowy roads that have been de-iced--the ball joint can corrode.

If that corrosion is severe enough, the ball joint can cause the front lower control arm to separate from the vehicle. That would make the CX-7 much harder to steer and boost the risk of an accident.

As with many corrosion-related recalls--particularly those that relate to road salts--this one will be carried out in phases. The first phase will focus on older, 2007 and 2008 models nationwide, as well as 2009-2011 vehicles currently registered in colder areas, including Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia. West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the District of Columbia.

After those vehicles have been fixed, the recall will focus attention on 2009-2011 vehicles elsewhere.

The recall is limited to 2007-2012 Mazda CX-7 vehicles built between February 14, 2006 and May 9, 2012. Mazda says that a total of 190,102 of those vehicles are registered in the U.S.

Unfortunately, Mazda doesn't have the necessary parts to begin fixing any vehicles yet. Interim recall notices will be mailed around October 10, with a follow-up mailed when parts become available. 

In the meantime, if you own one of the crossovers affected by this recall and have questions, you're encouraged to call Mazda customer service at 1-800-222-5500 and ask about recall #9716H. Alternately, you can ring NHTSA's Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 and ask about safety campaign #16V593000.

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