GM recalls over 500,000 more vehicles with suspension problems. Is yours on the list?

General Motors announced two new recalls Friday pushing its total for the year to 71 recalls affecting nearly 30 million vehicles in North America. Friday's  biggest recall affect 430,000 Cadillac SRX  and and  Saab 9-4X SUVs with improperly tightened rear suspension nuts. 

Carlos Barria/Reuters/File
Chevrolet cars are seen at a GM dealership in Miami. GM has issued two more recalls of SUVs and mini cars, brining its historic run of recalls up to 71 for the year.

General Motors announced two more recalls Friday, pushing its total for the year to 71, affecting almost 30 million vehicles in North America.

The biggest of the new recalls covers just over 430,000 Cadillac SRX and Saab 9-4X SUVs, mainly in North America. The company says some rear suspension nuts may not have been tightened properly. That could cause the toe link adjuster to separate from the suspension, possibly causing a crash.

The recall affects SRXs from the 2011 through 2015 model years and Saabs from the 2011 and 2012 model years. GM says the problem has caused three crashes and two injuries.

Dealers will inspect the SUVs and install a new assembly if needed. Unsold SRXs are being checked to make sure the nuts are tightened properly.

The other recall covers nearly 94,000 Chevrolet Spark mini-cars from 2013 through 2015 in the U.S. and Canada. Rust can cause a secondary hood latch to stick, and the hood can open unexpectedly, blocking the driver's vision and causing a crash. GM says it knows of no crashes or injuries from the problem.

Dealers will replace the latch when parts are available. GM has told dealers not to sell about 13,000 cars on their lots until the repairs are made.

The company found out about the problem in March when it got reports of three latches corroding prematurely in the United Kingdom. In all three cases, the hood opened while the cars were being driven, according to documents GM filed with U.S. safety regulators. The company also received 10 warranty complaints in the U.S. for rusted latches.

GM traced the problem to an anti-corrosion coating on the latch that didn't meet company specifications. The coating was changed at the factory on July 31.

General Motors Co. shares edged up 31 cents to $33.49 in morning trading Friday. Its shares had fallen almost 19 percent so far this year through Thursday's close.

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