Ford recalls 850,000 vehicles with airbag defects. Is yours on the list?

Ford will recall about 850,000 cars and SUVs because of a problem that could stop the air bags from working in a crash. The models in the Ford recall include the 2013-14 Ford C-Max compact, Fusion midsize, Escape SUV and the Lincoln MKZ luxury car, all sold in North America.

Danny Moloshok/Reuters/File
The 2013 Ford Escape is unveiled at the LA Auto Show in Los Angeles. Ford Motor Co said it will recall about 850,000 cars in the United States, including 2013-2014 models Ford C-MAX, Fusion, Escape and Lincoln MKZ vehicles, to fix a software glitch that could lead to a short circuit, delaying the deployment of airbags in the event of a crash.

Ford is recalling about 850,000 cars and SUVs because of a problem that could stop the air bags from working in a crash.

The recalled models include the 2013-14 Ford C-Max compact, Fusion midsize, Escape SUV and the Lincoln MKZ luxury car, all sold in North America.

Ford says the restraints control module in the car could short circuit, causing the air-bag warning indicator to light up. If the short circuit occurs, restraint devices including the air bags, pretensioners, and side curtains might not work in a crash.

The short circuit could also affect the car's stability control and other systems.

Ford Motor Co. says it is unaware of any accidents or injuries related to the problem. Dealerships will replace the restraints control module at no cost.

The company said 745,000 of the vehicles were sold in the U.S., with 82,000 sold in Canada and 20,000 sold in Mexico.

Ford shares rose 7 cents to $16.27 in morning trading.

Automakers have recalled more than 40 million cars and trucks in the U.S. so far this year, which is a record. Most of those vehicles have beenrecalled by General Motors Co., which announced early this year that a faulty ignition switch could cut power to the engine, knocking out the power steering or brakes and disabling the air bags if the car crashes.

The full list of vehicles affected by the Ford recall includes: certain 2013-2014 C-MAX vehicles built at Michigan Assembly Plant, Jan. 19, 2012 to Nov. 21, 2013; certain 2013-2014 Fusion vehicles built at Hermosillo Assembly Plant, Feb. 3, 2012 to Aug. 24, 2013; certain 2013-2014 Escape vehicles built at Louisville Assembly Plant, Oct. 5, 2011 to Nov. 1, 2013 and certain 2013-2014 Lincoln MKZ vehicles built at Hermosillo Assembly Plant, April 25, 2012 to Sept. 30, 2013.

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