GM recalls 200,000-plus Cadillacs, Impalas for brake flaw

General Motors recall involves 2013-15 model Cadillacs and 2014-15 Chevy Impalas, mostly in the US, because their parking brakes may not fully disengage, raising the risk of fires. GM will fix recalled vehicles for free.

Chevrolet/AP/File
A new GM recall over a parking-brake flaw involves 2014 Chevrolet Impalas.

General Motors is recalling 221,558 Cadillac XTS and Chevrolet Impala sedans because the brake pads can stay partially engaged even when they're not needed, increasing the risk of a fire.

The recall involves Cadillacs from the 2013-2015 model years and Impalas from the 2014 and 2015 model years. There are 205,309 vehicles affected in the U.S.; the rest of the vehicles are in Canada and elsewhere.

GM says the electronic parking brake arm that applies pressure to the back of the brake pads may not fully retract after use. If the brake pads stay partially engaged with the rotor, excessive brake heat may result in a fire.

GM says it knows of no accidents or injuries related to the defect.

GM will notify owners and repair the vehicles for free.

The brake recall is separate from GM's recalls over faulty ignition switches, which continues to unfold.

In this past week, the attorney in charge of GM's victims' compensation fund has linked 19 fatalities to the flawed ignition switches, Monitor blogging partner The Car Connection reported this past week. That's up from the 13 that GM had admitted to – and that total could continue to rise as more claims come in.

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