Ford recall involves 435,000 vehicles with corrosion, seat issues

Ford recall will include nearly 435,000 cars and SUVs that need repairs for rusting frame parts or faulty seats. One crash but no injuries are linked to the Ford recall. 

David Zalubowski/AP/File
The Ford logo shines on the grille of a 2006 Ford Escape outside the showroom of a dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. A Ford recall of nearly 435,000 vehicles includes Escape SUVs with model years between 2001 and 2004.

Ford is recalling nearly 435,000 cars and SUVs to fix rusting frame parts or faulty seats.

The biggest of the two Ford recalls covers nearly 386,000 Ford Escapes from the 2001 through 2004 model years. Ford says the subframes can rust, allowing a control arm to separate and hamper steering control. Ford is aware of one crash but no injuries linked to the problem.

The SUVs were originally sold or registered in 20 states and Washington, D.C., where salt is used to clear snow and ice from roads. Six Canadian provinces also are included.

Dealers will install a reinforcement brace to fix the problem.

The Escapes covered by the recall were built from Oct. 22, 1999 through Dec. 19, 2003 at the Kansas City Assembly plant, and from May 1, 2003 through Jan. 23, 2004 at the Ohio Assembly plant, Ford said in a statement issued Monday.

They were originally sold or registered in Connecticut, Iowa, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin, Delaware, Maine, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Vermont, Indiana, Michigan, New York, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. Also covered are Escapes sold or registered in Ontario, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland & Labrador.

The second recall covers 49,000 Ford Fusion, Lincoln MKZ, Ford Escape and C-MAX vehicles from 2013 and 2014. Dealers will replace seat back frames that weren't welded properly. No crashes or injuries have been reported from the problem, Ford said.

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