Volvo to add smart tech to dashboard in 2014

The new Volvo system enables drivers to set destinations through their mobile device, get information about their surroundings through Wikipedia, and even stream Pandora, among other app-enabled options.

Bob Strong/Reuters/File
Volvo's corporate logo on the rear hatch of a Volvo C30 in a showroom near the Volvo Car Corporation Headquarters in Gothenburg, Sweden. Volvo will introduce a Sensus Connect infotainment system in 2014.

Volvo has announced an update for its Sensus Connect infotainment system that enables it to deliver new cloud-based services, offering drivers and passengers of Volvo cars a vast array of new app services such as paying for parking from the car, locating new restaurants at any given destination, and streaming music and video. It also allows for in-car WiFi.

The updated system also provides full support for Pandora Internet Radio. Drivers can now stream Pandora via a data connection provided by the car’s built-in modem or their smartphone. Control of Pandora features such as station creation and thumbs feedback are now available via the head unit, making access to personalized radio in the car is as easy as regular radio.

For navigation, the system enables drivers to set destinations through their mobile device, get information about their surroundings through Wikipedia and also lets them find and pay for parking at their destination using the Park&Pay application. Sensus Connect also includes lifetime map upgrades, so you never have to worry about outdated maps.

The updated Sensus Connect system will be available in all new Volvo models starting from May of this year. Drivers who already have Sensus Connect in their cars today will be offered an update for their system.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.