Camaro Hot Wheels and a roundup of today's car news

Chevrolet's Camaro gets a special appearance edition in the form of the Hot Wheels Edition, Ireson writes. The Hot Wheels upgrade costs $6,995 and is available on any standard Camaro or Camaro Convertible.

Tyler Mallory/Chevrolet/Reuters/Handout
General Motors Vice President of Global Design Ed Welburn unveils the 2012 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 -- the fastest Camaro ever offered by Chevrolet --at the Chicago Auto Show in this February 2011 file photo. Chevrolet's Camaro is getting a special Hot Wheels Edition, Ireson writes.

BMW has launched a new Frozen Limited Edition of the 2013 M3 Coupe, and it wears a special Frozen pain finish in a range of colors, as well as getting the Competition Package and other goodies.

Chevrolet's Camaro also gets a special appearance edition, in the form of the Hot Wheels Edition, a $6,995 package upgrade on any standard Camaro or Camaro Convertible--which can be ordered from your dealer. The car will make its debut at SEMA this week.

And Lexus is also bringing a car to SEMA, but this time it's not just about looks: Lexus is adding a supercharger to the GS 350 F Sport. Yes, it sounds like fun to us, too. 

You'll find all of this and more in today's car news headlines here at Motor Authority.

2013 BMW M3 Coupe Frozen Limited Edition Models Launched

Chevrolet Camaro Hot Wheels Edition Can Be Yours: Video

Lexus Bringing Supercharged GS 350 F Sport To SEMA Show

2013 BMW X1 Video First Drive

HSV Reveals Details About Holden Commodore-Based One-Make Racing Series

The Amazing Collection At Chinese Supercar Dealer FFF-Automobile: Video

Vettel Wins, Alonso Comes Second At Formula 1 Indian Grand Prix

See Nissan's Wireless Charging With Automatic Parking Location (Video)

Now, Even Fast Cars Are Avoiding Gas-Guzzler Tax

Texting Tickets Could Cost You Down The Road

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