After reports of injuries and explosions, Samsung recalls washing machines

Still reeling from negative publicity around exploding batteries in the Galaxy Note 7 smartphone, Samsung is now recalling 2.8 million top-load washing machines.

Samsung Electronics Co Ltd, already reeling from a global recall of its Note 7 smartphones, said on Friday it would recall about 2.8 million top-load washing machines in the United States following reports of injuries.

The top of the washing machines can unexpectedly detach from the chassis during use, posing a risk of injury from impact, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said.

The South Korean tech company has received nine reports of injuries, including a broken jaw, an injured shoulder and other fall-related injuries, the agency said.

Samsung has received 733 reports of excessive vibration in thewashing machines or the top detaching from the chassis.

The recall involves 34 models of top-load washing machines made between March 2011 and November 2016 and costing $450-$1,500. 

The top of the affected washing machines could separate when a high-speed spin cycle is used for washing bedding, water-resistant or bulky items, Samsung said.

The company has also been sued by some US customers, who have alleged that their machines "explode during normal use."

Samsung, the world's top smartphone maker, scrapped its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone last month after failing to resolve safety concerns.

It had announced the recall of 2.5 million Note 7s in early September following numerous reports of the phones catching fire. The concerns prompted Federal Aviation Administration to ban all Note 7s from planes originating in or bound for the United States.

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