Target pajama recall: Children's clothes fail flame tests

Target pajama recall: Target and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have issued a recall for two-piece children's pajamas sold between Aug. 2012 and Nov. 2012. The pajamas can be returned to Target for a full refund.

CPSC
Target recalls these children's two-piece pajamas for failing federal flammability standards.

Target and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have issued a product recall for two-piece children's pajama sets. Some 560,000 of the children's pajamas have been sold by Target in stores and online between August 2012 and November 2012.

According to the CPSC: "The children's cotton or cotton/fleece pajamas sets fail to meet the federal flammability standards for children's sleepwear, because they do not meet the tight-fitting sizing requirements. This poses a burn hazard to children."

The garment manufacturer is Makalot Garments Co. Ltd., of Taiwan. The CPSC recommends that consumers take the recalled pajamas away from children and return them to any Target for a full refund.

Recalls for children's products are not uncommon. In the past six months, there have been at least nine recalls of children's clothing, and five of those were for pajamas, according to the children's recall report on Parents.com.

Here's a link to the full CPSC recall list for children's items (not including toys).

Here's the full text of the CPSC recall statement:

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Children's two-piece pajama sets

Units: About 560,000

Importer: Target Corp., of Minneapolis, Minn.

Manufacturer: Makalot Garments Co. Ltd., of Taiwan

Hazard: The children's cotton or cotton/fleece pajamas sets fail to meet the federal flammability standards for children's sleepwear, because they do not meet the tight-fitting sizing requirements. This poses a burn hazard to children.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Description: This recall involves Target Circo and Xhilaration children's cotton or cotton/fleece two-piece pajama sets. They were sold in infant and toddler sizes 12M, 2T, 3T, 4T and 5T, and in girls and boys sizes XS, S, M, L and XL. There are a variety of colors and designs, including stars, dots, skulls, peace signs, cats, owls, footballs and camouflage. To see a complete list of item numbers included in this recall, visit the firm's website. The item number is located on a tag on the shirt's side seam and on the pants at the waist. A tag printed on the neck of the pajamas states "Circo" or "Xhilaration", "Wear snug-fitting not flame resistant" and the item number. The pajamas were also sold with a yellow hangtag that states, "For child's safety, garment should fit snugly. This garment is not flame resistant. Loose-fitting garment is more likely to catch fire."

Sold exclusively at: Target stores nationwide and online at target.com from August 2012 through November 2012 for between $8 and $13.

Manufactured in: Vietnam and Cambodia

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled pajamas away from children and return them to any Target for a full refund.

Consumer Contact: Target; at (800) 440-0680, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or online at www.target.com and click on Product Recalls at the bottom of the page for more information.

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