James Patterson does it again: more school library donations

Patterson originally announced that he would be donating $1.25 million to school libraries but now he's increasing the amount to $1.5 million. 'I’m blown away by the number of parents and teachers who have shared the urgent needs of their community’s school library,” the author said in a statement. 'It’s clear that our school libraries require critical help.'

Wilfredo Lee/AP
Author James Patterson contemplates a question during an interview at his home overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway in Palm Beach, Fla.

More libraries will be receiving funds through James Patterson’s initiative. 

As we previously reported, the author announced earlier this month that he would be donating $1.25 million to school libraries. For a school to be nominated, someone simply needs to fill out a form with information about the school and the way in which it would use the money. Funds given to schools would be between $1,000 and $10,000 and any American school that has any of the grades from kindergarten to twelfth grade qualifies. In addition, Scholastic is giving the library “bonus points” that are used for teachers to receive books and other items.

It turns out many, many school libraries have applied. According to booksellers industry newsletter Shelf Awareness, there was an “immediate and overwhelming response,” so Patterson will be donating $1.5 million. Applications can be sent in until May 31. 

“I’m blown away by the number of parents and teachers who have shared the urgent needs of their community’s school library,” the author said in a statement, according to the Washington Post. “It’s clear that our school libraries require critical help. I know we can’t solve the issues overnight, but I hope at the very least we’re able to raise awareness about the important position the school library plays in the educational achievement of children.”

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