'Game of Thrones' actors Lena Headey, Charles Dance cast in 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies'

Charles Dance and Lena Headey portray father and daughter Tywin and Cersei Lannister on the HBO fantasy series 'Game of Thrones.'

Helen Sloan/HBO/AP
Charles Dance will reportedly appear in the movie 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.'

“Game of Thrones” actors Charles Dance and Lena Headey, who portrayed father Tywin and daughter Cersei Lannister on the smash hit HBO fantasy drama, will reportedly appear in a movie together.

According to Deadline, both Dance and Headey will star in the upcoming movie “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” which is based on the Seth Grahame-Smith book in which the text of the Jane Austen classic is altered so Elizabeth Bennet and her suitor Mr. Darcy are also fighting off a plague of the undead. 

Dance and Headey join “Downton Abbey” actress Lily James, who is playing Elizabeth Bennet, according to the Washington Post, while Sam Riley of “Maleficent” will play Fitzwilliam Darcy. In addition, “Doctor Who” actor Matt Smith will play Mr. Collins, the clergyman who briefly tries for Elizabeth’s hand in marriage. “Romeo and Juliet” actor Douglas Booth will play Mr. Bingley, the suitor of Elizabeth’s sister Jane, while Jane herself will be portrayed by Bella Heathcote of “Dark Shadows,” according to Variety, and “Boardwalk Empire” actor Jack Huston will play Mr. Darcy’s enemy Mr. Wickham. 

The production has been in the works for a long time, and according to the Hollywood Reporter, the movie is set to be released sometime in 2015. 

(Spoilers for the most recent season of “Game of Thrones” follow…)

Headey was nominated for an Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Emmy for her work on “Thrones” and has also appeared in such movies as the 2006 movie “300,” the 2013 movie “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones,” and 2012’s “Dredd.” Dance is presumably seeking other work now that his character Tywin was killed by his son Tyrion (Peter Dinklage) in the series finale of the most recent season of “Thrones,” but Dance did spark fan curiosity when he recently told MTV, “Well, I’m not completely missing out on the next [season]… More than that, I’m not going to say… so, you haven’t seen the last of Tywin Lannister.” He appears in the movie “Dracula Untold,” which is being released on Oct. 10, as well as the Alan Turing biopic, “The Imitation Game,” which is getting Oscar buzz and which hits theaters in November.

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