NY governor Andrew Cuomo will write memoir for 2014

Andrew Cuomo's memoir will be 'a full and frank look at his public and private life,' according to publisher HarperCollins.

Mike Groll/AP
New York governor Andrew Cuomo's memoir is scheduled for a 2014 release.

New York governor Andrew M. Cuomo will release a memoir in 2014 that will be published by HarperCollins.

Cuomo’s memoir will be “a full and frank look at his public and private life – from his formative years in Queens, New York, his long record of fighting for justice and championing government reform, his commitment to public service, and his election and service as the 56th Governor of New York State,” according to a statement from the publisher.

In the deal, Cuomo was represented by lawyer Robert Barnett. Barnett has also worked for politicians such as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama

“He will reveal the story of his history and will share personal and private moments that shaped his life: his father's legacy, his personal trials and tribulations, and his role as a father to his three girls,” HarperCollins said of the book in a statement.

According to The New York Times, the publisher is trying to decide what to do about a planned biography of Cuomo that HarperCollins was going to release. New York Post columnist Fredric U. Dicker was going to pen a book about Cuomo to be released this year, but relations between Dicker and Cuomo have grown frosty, according to the Times.

HarperCollins representative Tina Andreadis said Dicker’s book is still under contract.

Cuomo’s memoir announcement comes as those in the political world speculate on whether he’ll try for a presidential run in 2016. A New York Post article reported that Cuomo would not run for president if Clinton decided to do so, but Cuomo refuted the article.

“There is no truth to the assertion that I am talking presidential politics and strategy and what Hillary Clinton should do or shouldn’t do or what I’m doing presidentially,” Cuomo said, according to the Associated Press. “The only discussions I’m having are how to help this state… and to the extent that I’m focusing on politics, it’s my race next year.”

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