Bill O'Reilly book: 'Killing Jesus' due out in September

Bill O'Reilly book: 'Killing Jesus: A History' is due out in September says publisher. Bill O'Reilly has also written books titled "Killing Lincoln" and "Killing Kennedy."

REUTERS/Chris Kleponis/Lucas Jackson/Files
Fox News host Bill O'Reilly will be co-authoring a new book "Killing Jesus: A History."

After million-selling books on the assassinations of Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, Fox News host Bill O'Reilly is turning to the most famous killing of all.

O'Reilly's "Killing Jesus: A History" will be published on Sept. 24.

Publisher Henry Holt and Co. announced Wednesday night O'Reilly will collaborate on the book with Martin Dugard, his co-author for "Killing Lincoln" and "Killing Kennedy."

O'Reilly's book "Killing Lincoln' got the following review in The Christian Science Monitor:

"As he told his colleagues at Fox and Friends, his goal was to craft a story that would read "like a thriller," and yet instruct the nation on the qualities required of the next president of the United States. O'Reilly's "Killing Lincoln" has succeeded in at least one respect. It delivers a taut, action-packed narrative with cliff-hangers aplenty, no mean feat since we all know how the story ends.

But whether the book succeeds as a lesson in moral leadership is quite another question.In the hands of O'Reilly and his co-author, Martin Dugard, Lincoln's assassination most resembles the kind of morality tale beloved of cable news networks: sensationalized, suggestive, and overly simplistic."

It was also reported that the National Park Service, citing inaccuracies, had decided not to sell the book – which is co-authored by Martin Dugard – at Ford's Theatre, the museum that is also the site of the assassination. Deputy park superintendent Rae Emerson conducted a study on the book and concluded that its errors were too numerous for the museum to want to offer the book for sale.

The Monitor reported that "O'Reilly has not been taking such criticism quietly. On his show, he said that the book had two typos and “four minor misstatements, all of which have been corrected.” He said he has invited Emerson to appear on his show to discuss his book."

O'Reilly has written or co-written several best-sellers, including "Pinheads and Patriots" and "A Bold Fresh Piece of Humanity."

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