Modern field guide to security and privacy
An illustration of the web of vulnerabilities.
Alicia Tatone
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Video: What is a zero-day?

Melanie Teplinsky, cybersecurity expert and adjunct professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, explains. 

There's a race going on between hackers, governments, and companies to discover zero-day vulnerabilities. 

Why are these flaws so valuable? Because the companies don't know about them – so if they get into the wrong hands, hackers can access people's data without them knowing.  

Melanie Teplinsky, cybersecurity expert and adjunct professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, explains the lifecycle of a zero-day. 

This video is part of a joint project between The Christian Science Monitor’s Passcode team and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism about the growing arms race to discover software vulnerabilities – and what it means for national security and everyone’s digital privacy and safety. 

See the full 'Web of Vulnerabilities' multimedia project: passcode.csmonitor.com/theweb

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