London Olympics: What to watch today, beach volleyball and boxing

While swimming and gymnastics may take center stage, American athletes in other sports will also be in top form today.

Peter Schneider/AP
Misty May-Treanor, (l.), and Kerri Walsh celebrate their victory after the final game during the beach volleyball World Tour, July 7, in Gstaad, Switzerland. The pair will take on Australia in the Olympics today at 5 p.m.

Full Olympic coverage begins today on NBC and nbcolympics.com. While most Americans will be watching Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte duke it out in the pool, or the US men's gymnastics team vault and tumble, there are other members of Team USA worth watching as they work their way toward a medal.

Both the men and women will take take to the sand today in beach volleyball. Jake Gibb from Bountiful Utah, and Sean Rosenthal from Redondo Beach Calif. take on South Africa today at 4 p.m. Gibb and Rosenthal will be looking to medal this summer, they came up short in Beijing, finishing fifth place. The two have been playing together since 2006.

At 5 p.m. the women's powerhouse duo, Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh Jennings will play Australia. May-Treanor and Walsh Jennings are looking for their third consecutive gold medal in beach volleyball. The pair is favored to win, but has faced a few challenges in the run up to the 2012 games.

In 2008, May-Treanor tore her Achilles tendon while competing on the show "Dancing With the Stars." During the break between 2008 and 2012 Walsh Jennings also took time off to have a family. Despite their time off, May-Treanor and Walsh Jennings won three gold and four silver medals on the 2011 World Tour.

In boxing, American MIddleweight Terrell Gausha, from Cleveland, will box against Armenian Andranik Hakobyan today at 5:15 p.m. Gausha has a good shot at gold. He is the reigning USA National Middleweight Champion, winning a double tie-breaker to take that title, and he is a five-time Cleveland Golden Gloves Champion.

A complete schedule of coverage is available at nbcolympics.com.

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