Earthquake warning on your smartphone? There may be an app for that

The GPS in smartphones could detect earthquakes and trigger warnings seconds before the strongest waves from the quake begin, researchers say.

Gustau Nacarino/Reuters/File
A hostess displays the new Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona March 2. GPS receivers in smartphones, though less accurate than the scientific-grade equipment, could detect medium to large earthquakes like the 7.0 magnitude quake that rocked Haiti in 2010, killing more than 200,000 people.

Countries looking for cheap earthquake warning systems might want to try apps and smartphones after scientists discovered that smartphones could be used as an affordable alternative to sophisticated earthquake monitoring networks.

The Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in smartphones could detect earthquakes and trigger warnings seconds before the strongest waves from the quake begin, researchers wrote in Friday's [April 10] American-based journal Science Advances.

"Most of the world does not receive earthquake warnings, mainly due to the cost of building the necessary scientific monitoring networks," said Benjamin Brooks, USGS geophysicist and project lead.

Although many parts of the world are prone to earthquakes, systems that detect the start of an earthquake and send warnings to people before they feel the ground shaking are operating in only a few regions, including Japan and Mexico.

GPS receivers in smartphones, though less accurate than the scientific-grade equipment, could detect medium to large earthquakes like the 7.0 magnitude quake that rocked Haiti in 2010, killing more than 200,000 people.

After analyzing the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami, the researchers concluded that lives could have been saved if GPS data had been used to send warnings before seismic waves reached Tokyo and before the deadly tsunami wave reached the shore.

"The speed of an electronic warning travels faster than the earthquake shaking does," said Craig Glennie, one of the authors of the report and a professor at the University of Houston.

The researchers found that data gathered from fewer than 5,000 smartphones in a metropolitan area could be analyzed fast enough to issue a warning for people further away from the epicenter and potentially save lives.

The researchers didn't specify if smartphone users would receive warnings through messages, calls, or applications.

"Crowd-sourced data are less precise [than high-quality networks], but for larger earthquakes ... they contain enough information to detect that an earthquake has occurred, information necessary for early warning," Susan Owen, co-author of the study, said in a statement.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has already agreed to test a pilot warning system comprising smartphone sensors and scientific-grade sensors along the Chilean coast.

(Reporting By Magdalena Mis; Editing by Tim Pearce)

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