Why US drones are now operating in Iraq

The US confirmed the use of armed drones in Iraq for reconnaissance. Will the US drones be used to attack ISIS insurgents in Iraq?

 The U.S. has armed drones flying over Baghdad to protect U.S. troops that recently arrived to assess Iraq's deteriorating security, the Pentagon said.

The military for more than a week has been flying manned and unmanned aircraft over Iraq, averaging a few dozen sorties daily for reconnaissance. The decision to arm some of the drones follows the deployment to Baghdad of troops who will advise and assist Iraqi counterterrorism forces.

"The reason that some of those aircraft are armed is primarily for force protection reasons now that we have introduced into the country some military advisers whose objective will be to operate outside the confines of the embassy," the Defense Department's press secretary, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby, told a Pentagon press conference Friday.

Using U.S. air assets to target the leaders of the Sunni-led insurgency is one of the options being prepared for President Barack Obama as he considers what support to provide to Iraq, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Martin Dempsey, said in a radio interview. Protection of critical infrastructure is part of that option, he said.

"We're flying a great deal (of) manned and unmanned ... intelligence and reconnaissance assets, and we're building a picture so that if the decision were made to support the Iraqi security forces as they confront (ISIS), we could do so," Dempsey said.

So far, 180 of 300 troops promised by Obama have arrived in the country. That's 90 advisers and 90 who are setting up an operations and intelligence analysis unit.

A handful of Predators armed with Hellfire missiles are being used over the capital for the new force protection mission, a senior defense official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the new flights on the record and requested anonymity.

Officials stressed that Obama still has not authorized airstrikes against Sunni militants who have been overrunning territory in other parts of the country.

Meanwhile, the Task Force on US Drone Policy, co-chaired by retired Gen. John Abizaid, former head of US Central Command, released a report this week criticizing the use of drones in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen. “We are concerned that the Obama administration’s heavy reliance on targeted killings as a pillar of US counterterrorism strategy rests on questionable assumptions, and risks increasing instability and escalating conflicts,” the task force warned.

The Christian Science Monitor reports:

The American government takes the view that it has a legal right to use force in foreign sovereign states when these states are “unwilling or unable” to take what the US considers to be “appropriate action” to eliminate “imminent threats,” reports the Stimson Center, which convened the panel.

But this argument has created a troubling “slippery slope,” since “inevitably, assessments of what constitutes an imminent threat to the United States and what would constitute appropriate action are somewhat subjective in nature,” the report adds.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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