Pro-Russians block eastern Ukraine from voting prep

At least half of the election districts in the eastern Ukraine have been prevented from preparing for Sunday's presidential election, a Ukrainian official says.

Pro-Russian insurgents have prevented at least half of the election districts in the embattled east of the country to prepare for Sunday's presidential election, a Ukrainian official says.

Volodymyr Hrinyak, chief of the public security department at the Ukrainian Interior Ministry, said Saturday that 17 out of 34 district election commissions in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions are not operating because their offices have either been seized or blocked by armed men. Hrinyak's update was reported by the Interfax news agency.

The insurgents have controlled parts of Ukraine for weeks. Following their declaration of independence earlier this month, they pledged to derail the vote which they regard as an election in "a neighboring country."

They remain defiant although Russian President Vladimir Putin said Friday that he is prepared to work with the election winner. But on Saturday Putin accused the West of ignoring Russia's interests in Ukraine, in particular by leaving open the possibility that Ukraine could one day join NATO.

Russia has serious concerns that the new government in Kiev could take Ukraine into the Western military alliance. Putin earlier said that the decision to annex Crimea was driven in part by the need to prevent NATO ships from ever being based on the Black Sea peninsula.

Putin told senior representatives of major international news agencies, including The Associated Press, on Saturday that the West has never had a substantive discussion with Russia on this.

He said: "We hear only one answer, as if on a record: Every nation has a right to determine its own fate and it doesn't concern you."

Twenty-one candidates are competing to become Ukraine's next leader. Polls show billionaire candy-maker Petro Poroshenko with a commanding lead, but short of the absolute majority needed to win in the first round. His nearest challenger is Yulia Tymoshenko, the divisive former prime minister who is far behind.

Most polls suggest Poroshenko would win a runoff ballot, which would be held on June 15.

Fighting was reported Friday between pro-Russia separatists and government forces in eastern Ukraine as Kiev continued an offensive to try to halt the uprising.

Associated Press reporters saw two dead Ukrainian soldiers near the village of Karlivka, and another body near a rebel checkpoint, both in the Donetsk region. A rebel leader said 16 more people died Friday in fighting there — 10 soldiers, four rebels and two civilians — but there was no immediate way to verify his statement.

In Kiev, the Defense Ministry said 20 insurgents were killed in an attack on a convoy of government troops Thursday by about 500 rebels, the largest insurgent assault yet reported. The clash could not be independently confirmed and it was unclear why such a large attack in a populated region would have gone unreported for more than a day.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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