Paul McCartney cancels South Korea concert due to illness

Paul McCartney, who turns 72 next month, had planned to hold concerts in Japan and South Korea as part of his world tour.

Zach Cordner/Invision/AP
Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr perform at The Night that Changed America: A Grammy Salute to the Beatles, in Los Angeles, in Jan. McCartney has canceled his concert in South Korea next week due to the illness that forced him to call off his entire Japan tour, organizers said May 21.

Paul McCartney has canceled his concert in South Korea next week due to the illness that forced him to call off his entire Japan tour, organizers said Wednesday.

The former Beatle, who turns 72 next month, had planned to hold concerts in Japan and South Korea as part of his world tour.

"I was really looking forward to visiting and playing in South Korea for the first time and I'm sorry to be letting fans down,"McCartney was quoted as saying in a statement released by Seoul-based Hyundai Card Co. Ltd., an organizer for his South Korea concert. "I'm very disappointed by this and hope to be able to visit soon."

The statement said that "Paul is still not feeling better and this cancellation is unavoidable."

Organizers said McCartney's side didn't give them details about his illness. Representatives for McCartney declined to comment to The Associated Press about his condition Wednesday.

Hyundai Card officials said they would offer a refund on the tickets, which range from about $55 to $290.

McCartney was scheduled to perform at a Seoul stadium on May 28. It would have been his first concert in South Korea.

His illness caused him to miss his four scheduled concerts in Japan, including two in Tokyo this past weekend.

McCartney is scheduled next month to take his act to the U.S., where he'll hit several venues over two months.

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