Israeli airstrikes near Lebanon-Syria border

Israeli airstrikes: Residents in Nabi Sheet, a remote village in the eastern Bekaa Valley, reported hearing several explosions late Monday, but the nature of the blasts was unclear.

Israeli aircraft carried out two airstrikes Monday near the Lebanese-Syrian border, Lebanon's state news agency said. There was no immediate confirmation from Lebanese security officials, and the Israeli military declined comment.

Lebanon's National News Agency said the air raids took place near Nabi Sheet, a remote village in the eastern Bekaa Valley. The agency did not say what was targeted in the attack.

The porous border is frequently used by fighters and smugglers to move people and weapons between Lebanon and Syria. The Lebanese Shiite militant Hezbollah group, a close ally of Syria and a bitter enemy ofIsrael, also has a strong presence in the Bekaa area.

A Lebanese army spokesman said he had no indication of any airstrikes in the area, but that authorities were investigating the reports.

Residents in Nabi Sheet reported hearing several explosions late Monday, but the nature of the blasts was unclear.

Jaafar al-Musawi, head of Nabi Sheet Municipality, told Lebanon's Al-Jadeed TV there was no airstrike on the town. "We heard warplanes followed by explosions, it could be along the border with Syria," he said.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights activist group said Israeli warplanes bombed a rocket launcher for Hezbollah fighters near the villages of Janta and Yahfoufa along the border. It was not known if the strikes hit inside Lebanese or Syrian territory, the Observatory added.

Israel and Hezbollah fought a bloody month-long war in 2006 that ended in a stalemate. Israeli officials believe Hezbollah has restocked its arsenal with tens of thousands of rockets and missiles, some of which are capable of striking virtually anywhere in the Jewish state.

While Israel has tried to stay out of the war in neighboring Syria, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has repeatedly threatened to take military action to prevent Syria from transferring sophisticated weapons to its ally Hezbollah. Over the past year, Israel has carried out several airstrikes inside Syria to halt suspected shipments of advanced missiles, including Russian-made anti-aircraft missiles and guided missiles from Iran, from reaching Hezbollah. Israel has never confirmed the airstrikes.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Israeli airstrikes near Lebanon-Syria border
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0224/Israeli-airstrikes-near-Lebanon-Syria-border
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe