Bird steals camera: Makes video selfie over Australia

Bird steals camera: A brazen sea eagle steals a video camera set up to watch crocodiles. Wildlife rangers found the camera stolen by the bird  70 miles away.

A brazen bird snatched a video camera that was recording crocodiles in northwest Australia and captured fascinating footage of its 110-kilometer (70-mile) journey across the country's remote landscape.

Wildlife rangers in Western Australia's Kimberly region released video on Monday that reveals the sea eagle's caper. The bird's flapping wings can be seen as it grabs the device and takes off, and the eagle later poses for a selfie, poking its face into the camera lens.

Rangers set up the motion-sensor camera along the Margaret River in May, hoping to record images of crocodiles. The camera, which is about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) long and 5 centimeters (2 inches) wide, disappeared soon after and the rangers figured it had fallen into the water.

The rangers recently found out that the device had been found near the Mary River, about 110 kilometers (70 miles) away, ranger Roneil Skeen told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. When they examined the video inside, the real culprit was revealed.

The rangers plan to bolt down their cameras from now on, Skeen said.

The incident is similar to what happened in September 2012 in San Francisco. Nathalie Rollandin was filming a gorgeous sunset over the Golden Gate Bridge when a sneaky seagull snatched her GoPro and proceeded to fly with it over the water. Talk about a bird’s-eye view, reports VetStreet.com.

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