Pakistan to charge former president with treason

The Pakistani government plans to ask the Supreme Court to begin treason proceedings against former President Pervez Musharraf for declaring a state of emergency and suspending the country's constitution while he was in office. 

B.K. Bangash/AP/File
Pakistan's former President and military ruler Pervez Musharraf addresses his party supporters at his house in Islamabad, Pakistan in April 2013. Pakistan’s interior minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said Sunday, the government would put Musharraf on trial for treason under Article 6 of the constitution for declaring a state of emergency in 2007 and suspending the constitution.

Pakistan's government plans to put former President Pervez Musharraf on trial for treason for declaring a state of emergency and suspending the constitution while in power, the interior minister said Sunday.

Musharraf, a former army chief, would be the first military ruler tried for treason in a country that has experienced three military coups in its 66-year history. He could face the death penalty or life in prison if he is convicted of treason, but some question whether the country's powerful army actually will let that happen. Musharraf has maintained his innocence.

The government plans to send a letter to the Supreme Court on Monday asking that treason proceedings begin under Article 6 of the constitution, Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said during a news conference.

"Gen. Musharraf is accountable to the nation and the constitution," Khan said.

The interior minister insisted that the government's decision to put the former president on trial for treason was not a personal vendetta by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, who was toppled in a military coup by Musharraf in 1999.

Musharraf governed the country for nearly a decade but was forced to step down in 2008 after growing discontent with his rule. He left the country soon after. He returned to Pakistan in March after years in self-imposed exile, with the hope of running in the national election that was held in May. But he was disqualified from participating in the vote because of his actions while in power and has spent most of his time battling legal cases.

Musharraf was held under house arrest for months after returning and was only freed earlier this month after he received bail in four other cases facing him. But he is still barred from leaving the country.

The other cases facing Musharraf involve his alleged role in the murder of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, the death of a Baluch separatist leader killed by the army, the killing of a radical cleric and the detention of Pakistani judges.

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