Pope Francis plans to visit Assisi, home of St. Francis

Pope Francis took his name in recognition of Saint Francis, best known for his work with the poor and his love of animals.

L'Osservatore Romano / AP / File
Pope Francis kisses the foot of one of the 12 inmates whose feet he washed at the juvenile detention center of Casal del Marmo, Rome, on Maunday Thursday. The gesture of humility made history as the first time a pope has washed the feet of a woman or of a Muslim. 46 young men and women, many Gypsies or North African migrants, are currently detained at the facility.

Pope Francis plans to visit Assisi, the birthplace of the Italian saint who inspired his name.

Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi said Francis will probably make a pilgrimage to the Italian hill town sometime this year. Vatican Radio on Thursday also quoted Vatican officials who recently visited Rio de Janiero as saying details for the pontiff's trip in late July to Brazil were taking shape. Francis will lead Catholic youths in rallies there.

The radio quoted Lombardi as saying otherwise Francis had no immediate travel plans. Lombardi said the pope is happy with his quarters in a Vatican hotel, instead of the Apostolic Palace where past pontiffs have resided. Lombardi said "for now" Francis is staying put in the hotel although his decision to live there isn't "definitive."

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