Steve Jobs' superyacht can't leave Netherlands until payment spat resolved

Jobs collaborated on designing the 256-foot all-aluminum 'Venus,' which has a minimalist aesthetic, with French product designer Philippe Starck.

Peter Dejong/AP/File
The sleek, white superyacht Apple founder Steve Jobs commissioned before his death cannot leave the Netherlands just yet due to a payment dispute. Dutch newspaper Het Financieele Dagblad reported Friday Dec. 21, 2012 that Starck hired a debt collection agency and got a summary legal order to keep the boat from leaving.

The sleek, white superyacht Apple founder Steve Jobs commissioned before his death cannot leave the Netherlands just yet due to a payment dispute

Jobs collaborated on designing the 78.2-meter (256-foot) all-aluminum "Venus," which has a minimalist aesthetic, with French product designer Philippe Starck. Dutch newspaper Het Financieele Dagblad reported Friday that Starck hired a debt collection agency and got a summary legal order to keep the boat from leaving.

Port of Amsterdam spokesman Jeroen Ranzijn confirmed the boat has been in the harbor since Dec. 8, and won't leave until the civil dispute is resolved — possibly as early later Friday.

"It was actually ready to continue its voyage when there was a dispute between two parties, including the heirs, and one party laid a claim on the boat," said Ranzijn.

He said the dispute may be resolved shortly.

According to the paper, Starck had only been paid €6 million ($7.9 million) by Job's heirs, but believed he was owed €9 million. The boat cost €105 million.

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