Turkish police detain over 440 people in anti-IS operation

Turkey, which has been helping fight the Islamic State in Syria, is stepping up its domestic anti-terrorism efforts after a year marked by dozens of attacks linked to the terror group or Kurdish militants.

Mahir Alan/Dha-Depo Photos via AP
Turkish anti-terrorism police break a door during an operation to arrest people over alleged links to the Islamic State group, in Adiyaman, southeastern Turkey, early Sunday, Feb. 5, 2017. Turkey's state-run agency says anti-terrorism police have detained more than 400 people in simultaneous police operations that spanned several cities, including Istanbul and Gaziantep near the border with Syria, according to the report.

Turkey's anti-terrorism police have detained over 440 people for alleged links to the Islamic State group, the state-run news agency reported Sunday.

The Anadolu Agency said 60 suspects, the vast majority of them foreigners, were taken into custody early Sunday in the capital, Ankara.

It said a total of 445 people were detained in simultaneous pre-dawn police operations that spanned several cities, including Istanbul and Gaziantep, near the border with Syria.

The largest operation was in the southeast province of Sanliurfa, where police took into custody more than 100 suspects from multiple addresses and found materials relating to Islamic State militants.

Security forces also apprehended nine suspects who were allegedly preparing an attack in the northwestern city of Izmir.

Anadolu did not give the nationalities of all those detained but there were 10 minors among the foreigners detained in Istanbul and the northwestern province of Kocaeli.

Turkey, which last year endured a failed coup attempt and dozens of bloody attacks linked to IS or Kurdish militants, has been stepping up its anti-terrorism efforts.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for a New Year Eve mass shooting at an Istanbul nightclub that killed 39 people. It claims to have multiple cells in Turkey.

Turkey is a member of the NATO alliance and the U.S-led coalition against IS. It shares borders with Syria and Iraq, two war-torn nations at the heart of the fight against IS militants.

Turkish forces have been deployed in Syria since August with the aim of clearing a border patch of IS militants and Syrian Kurdish fighters that Ankara considers related to its own Kurdish insurgency.

Some of those taken into custody Sunday allegedly were active in conflict zones and others allegedly engaged in recruitment efforts for IS by relaying its propaganda over social media.

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