British repeal bill severing EU ties faces uphill battle

A bill published Thursday would dissolve Britain's ties to the EU if passed. Prime Minister May hopes to find compromise between the parties as legislation moves through Parliament and onto the negotiation table.

Olivier Holset/Reuters
Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn walks with European Union's chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier to begin Brexit negotiations at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels on July 13, 2017.

Britain published legislation on Thursday to sever political, financial, and legal ties with the European Union, an important step toward Brexit but one which the opposition said it would challenge.

The repeal bill is central to the government's plan to exit the EU in 2019, disentangling Britain from more than 40 years of EU lawmaking and repealing the treaty that first made Britain a member in 1972.

Its passage through parliament could make or break Prime Minister Theresa May's political future. The election she called last month cost her an outright parliamentary majority and reopened the debate on the nature of Brexit, with Britain's public spending watchdog saying the government was not well prepared.

"It is one of the most significant pieces of legislation that has ever passed through parliament and is a major milestone in the process of our withdrawal from the European Union," Brexit minister David Davis said in a statement.

The government also fleshed out its negotiating stance with the EU, publishing three position papers which underlined that Britain would quit nuclear body Euratom and leave the jursidiction of the European Court of Justice.

Ms. May faces a battle even within her own Conservative Party to stick to her plan of a clean break. Pro-Brexit lawmakers will give her little room for movement, while pro-Europeans are looking to soften the divorce terms.

Rebellion by either side could derail the legislation and test May's ability to negotiate a compromise or find support from opposition parties. If she fails, her position could swiftly become untenable.

Challenges ahead

The publication of the bill is the first step in a long legislative process to ease Brexit, which is stretching the government with the sheer volume of issues to cover.

A report by the government's spending watchdog said Britain's planned new customs system might not be ready in time for Brexit, adding to a list of concerns over the government's plans.

"We have been clear from the outset that we are putting the resources in place, have got the resources in place that we need to deliver on Brexit," May's spokesman told reporters.

The parliament has yet to set a date to debate the bill, which will be closely examined to see how the government plans to carry out the difficult and time-consuming technical exercise of transposing EU law.

The bill set out powers for ministers, with the approval of parliament, to correct laws to ensure they work after being brought into British law. These powers will exist until two years after the day Britain leaves.

Lawmakers have expressed concern that the sheer volume of work could limit their ability to scrutinize the changes effectively and fear the government will introduce policy change by the back door.

The main opposition Labour Party has said it would oppose the bill unless it met six conditions, including guarantees for workers' rights. Tim Farron, leader of the Liberal Democrats, said he would work to soften May's stance, promising the prime minister that "this will be hell."

The bill will also face scrutiny from British companies, many of which have spent the year since Britons voted by 52 percent to 48 to leave the EU trying to figure out how the change will affect their business.

"A legislative transition of this scope has never before been undertaken," Adam Marshall, director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, said in a statement.

"We will be keeping a watchful eye for the possibility of unintended consequences that lead to new burdens or compliance costs, whether particular firms, sectors or the economy as a whole."

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to British repeal bill severing EU ties faces uphill battle
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2017/0713/British-repeal-bill-severing-EU-ties-faces-uphill-battle
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe