No damages reported after biggest earthquake in South Korea's history

Two strong earthquakes rattled South Korea's Gyeongju city, including a record 5.8 magnitude temblor, but there were no reports of serious injuries or damage.

Sun Dong-jin/Yonhap/AP
An officer from the Korea Meteorological Administration briefs about an earthquake at the at the National Earthquake and Volcano Center in Seoul, South Korea, Monday. Officials say two earthquakes measuring magnitude 5.1 and 5.8 have jolted a historic city in southeastern South Korea, but there are no reports of serious injuries or damage.

Two strong earthquakes jolted an historic city in southeastern South Korea on Monday, but there were no reports of serious injuries or damage, officials said.

The Korea Meteorological Administration said the quakes measured magnitude 5.1 and 5.8 and were centered near Gyeongju city. It said the magnitude-5.8 quake was the largest ever recorded in South Korea.

Local television showed children hiding under a dinner table and goods falling off the shelves at a supermarket.

Officials said two people received minor injuries, but gave no further details. The Yonhap news agency said minor cracks appeared in some buildings, but no major damage was reported.

The quakes shook large areas of the country, including the capital, Seoul, where tall buildings swayed.

South Korea experiences relatively little seismic activity, unlike neighboring Japan, which has frequent major quakes.

Gyeongju was the capital of one of the Korean Peninsula's ancient kingdoms and is now a popular tourist destination.

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