Sisters found dead in villa on African island

The bodies of Annie Korkki and Robin Korkki were found in their resort villa last week in Seychelles.

A Minnesota man says his family has been given little information on how his two sisters died while vacationing on a tropical African island.

The bodies of Annie Korkki, 37, of Denver, and Robin Korkki, 42, of Chicago, were found in their resort villa last week in Seychelles, an archipelago nation off Africa's east coast in the Indian Ocean.

Their brother, Chris Korkki, said the family has learned nothing so far through official channels about his sisters' deaths. He said his mother and brother have traveled to Seychelles for answers and to make arrangements to bring his sisters' bodies back to the U.S.

"All I know is my mom and brother are working with local officials and the U.S. Embassy," Korkki told The Associated Press on Thursday, adding that embassy employees have been supportive.

Emails sent by the AP to police and the foreign ministry in Seychelles weren't immediately returned Thursday. Phone calls to the Seychelles foreign ministry and police rang unanswered.

The sisters' bodies were found Sept. 22 at the Maia Luxury Resort.

Korkki said his sisters were adventurous women who wanted to experience life to the fullest.

"They were frequent travelers both domestically and internationally," he said. "They were kind and generous and compassionate, and were wonderful people that had a positive impact on a huge number of people."

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