Meanwhile in ... Afghanistan, fans are rejoicing over what’s being called the 'fairy tale' success story of the country’s cricket team

And in Saudi Arabia, a woman has been told she cannot marry a man because he plays a musical instrument.

John Sibley/Reuters/FILE
Afghanistan's cricket team

Afghanistan, fans are rejoicing over what’s being called the “fairy tale” success story of the country’s cricket team. In the United Arab Emirates last month, at the 2018 Asia Cup cricket tournament, Afghanistan became the talk of the tournament by trouncing Sri Lanka and Bangladesh and then tying the powerhouse Indian team. Afghanistan’s cricket team is performing way above expectations against far more established competitors. “The incredible performances of Afghanistan has become a powerful symbol of hope and inspiration for the strife-torn nation,” reported Forbes. 

Saudi Arabia, a woman has been told she cannot marry a man because he plays a musical instrument. In Saudi Arabia, a woman may not marry without the consent of her male guardians. In this case, the woman’s male family members decided the suitor of her choice was “religiously incompatible” because he plays the oud, a stringed instrument common in the Middle East. The woman took her case to court but the court sided with the family, decreeing that interest in a musical instrument made her suitor insufficiently pious. According to Yahoo News, the woman – who has been identified only as a bank manager in charge of 300 employees – has said she will turn to the country’s “highest authorities,” the Saudi royal court.

Guatemala, laser technology has revealed more than 60,000 previously unknown Mayan structures. The structures identified include farms, houses, and forts, as well as 60 miles of roads and canals connecting large cities, reports History.com. Researchers say the new information reveals a more complex, interconnected, and highly populated civilization than had previously been imagined. 

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