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Meanwhile in ... Agome-Sevah, Togo, four female solar engineers have brought light to their village

And in Kabul, Afghanistan, Charlie Chaplin impersonator Karim Asir is doing all he can to keep fellow Afghanis smiling.

ISMAIL/REUTERS
KARIM ASIR MOHAMMAD

Kabul, Afghanistan, Charlie Chaplin impersonator Karim Asir is doing all he can to keep fellow Afghanis smiling. Mr. Asir told Reuters that he has witnessed suicide attacks, explosions, and threats from hard-line Islamic militant groups, but he keeps right on performing. Asir says he first saw a Charlie Chaplin impersonator as a child in Iran, where his family was living after fleeing the Taliban. When he returned to Afghanistan later in life, he decided to use Chaplin performances to lift the spirits of his fellow citizens. He performs at public parks, orphanages, private parties, and charity events. “I want to give my people a chance to forget their problems, such as war, conflicts, and insecurity in Afghanistan,” he says.  

Agome-Sevah, Togo, four female solar engineers have brought light to their village. Farmers and residents in this rural town of 1,500 were troubled by the extent to which the lack of electricity limited their local economy. So a local association named Dekamile sent four local women to India for six months to learn to install solar panels. None of the women can read or write, but this did not prevent them from learning basic engineering. “We can now charge our phones at home. And my wife is no longer setting off for miles to grind millet or grill corn,” a local maize farmer told CleanTechnica. 

Northern Austria, residents and police are seeking a rogue kangaroo that has been spotted bounding through the hills here. (And yes, that’s Austria, not Australia.) Although local zoos were initially contacted, the kangaroo is now suspected to be a pet on the run. There were also several sightings of kangaroos on the loose in southeast Austria in 2016, reports Mashable.

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