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Meanwhile in ... Victoria, Seychelles, stray dogs are being paired with prison inmates

And in Mexico City, traffic is notoriously frustrating, but a theater company is trying to lighten the mood.

Emilio Espejel/AP
Ballerinas dance in Mexico City.

Mexico City, traffic is notoriously frustrating. But a theater company is trying to lighten the mood. With a series of choreographed dances (to music ranging from “Swan Lake” to Michael Jackson’s “Rock With Me”), performers leap into the street as the streetlight changes and dance for exactly 58 seconds (the duration of the red light). The dances have become extremely popular and draw crowds. “We never thought this was going to have this kind of impact,” one of the dancers, Manuela Ospina Castro, told The Associated Press. “Not only are people accepting it, but they need it.”  

Victoria, Seychelles, stray dogs are being paired with prison inmates. The stray dogs need homes but are often unadoptable until they are trained. The inmates need meaningful work and relationships. To bring these needs together, Montagne Posée, the main prison on the African island nation, will house a kennel to be run by 30 inmates. Inmates will “need to attend to the emotional needs of the dogs by being attentive and caring,” prison superintendent Raymond St. Ange told the Seychelles News Agency, “and we expect the animals to attend to the emotional needs of the inmate by showing love.” Any dog who fails to find a home will stay on as a prison pet.

Mogadishu, somalia, deaf soccer players have formed their own league. Barred from playing in Somalia’s Football Federation, the deaf players have been playing informally since 2010 but have now decided to make a more formal arrangement. “We were not given equal chance with others, so we decided to form our own league. We are 30 players now,” one of the players told the BBC. “We have got huge support from the city residents who come to watch us and give us support.”

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