Israel vs. Hamas: The conflict by the numbers

The exchange of Hamas rockets and Israeli missiles began on July 8. A look at a few telling metrics, which only begin to shed light on the conflict.

Dan Balilty/AP
An Iron Dome air defense system fires July 9, 2014 to intercept a rocket from the Gaza Strip in Tel Aviv, Israel. Israel's 'Iron Dome' defense system has emerged as a game-changer in the current round of violence with Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip.

In light of The Economist’s index during the last Israeli offensive in Gaza in November 2012, here are some numbers from July 8-July 10 2014.

Number of Palestinians in Gaza killed by the Israeli military: At least 82, according to the Palestinian Ministry of Health via Al Akhbar news service.

Number of Israelis killed by Hamas rockets from Gaza: 0, according to news reports.

Number of Palestinians killed who are younger than 16 years-old: At least 21, according to the Palestinian Ministry of Health via Al Akhbar news service.

Number of Israeli civilians injured by Hamas: 9 injured, according to The Washington Post.

Number of Israeli soldiers injured by Hamas: 2 injured, according to CNN NewSource.

Number of rockets fired at Israeli cities: At least 470, according to The Los Angeles Times.

Number of incoming rockets intercepted by Iron Dome: 72 (with the rest falling in open areas), according to Reuters.

Percent of total rockets intercepted by Iron Dome: 27 percent, according to The New York Times.

Percent of incoming rockets intentionally intercepted by Iron Dome: 90 percent (up from 85 percent in 2012), according to Reuters.

Estimated cost of an interception by Iron Dome: $100,000, according to The New York Times.

Number of Iron Dome batteries: Seven, according to The New York Times.

Cost of one Iron Dome battery: $55 million, according to The New York Times.

Cost of a Qassam rocket: $800 according to The Jerusalem Post.

Range of a Qassam rocket: 3.7-7.5 miles, according to an IDF spokesperson.

Range of a M-302 rocket: 93 miles, according to The Free Republic.

Number of M-302 rockets in Hamas' arsenal: Several dozen, according to Haaretz.

Estimated number of rockets that Hamas has in its arsenal: 10,000, according to USA Today.

Number of Israeli reservists called up: 20,000, according to The Los Angeles Times.

Number of targets struck by Israel in the past three days: 750 sites, according to The New York Times.

Number of Israeli traffic fatalities in 2013: 303 persons, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Economic cost to the Gaza strip: unknown.

Economic cost to Israel: 8.5 billion shekels, US$2.5 billion, according to The Jerusalem Post.

GDP per capita in the Gaza strip: $876, according to The Washington Institute.

GDP per capita in Israel: $32,500, according to CIA Factbook.

 Number of Palestinians living in Gaza: 1.7 million people, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Number of Palestinians in the West Bank: 2.7 million people, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Number of Jewish Israelis: 6.1 million people, according to The Daily Mail.

Number of non-Jewish Israelis: 2 million people, according to The Daily Mail.

Size of Israeli Defense Forces: 176,000 active personnel, according to CNN.

Number of Hamas militants: 20,000, according to Reuters.

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