10 brands you'll have to give up if you're boycotting Israel

Here are 10 brands in the crosshairs of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement.

4. Intel

Pichi Chuang / Reuters
People visit the Intel booth at the 2013 Computex exhibition in Taipei.

Al-Awda, the Palestinian Right to Return Coalition, has called on Intel to close its plants in Kiryat Gat, site of the former Palestinian villages Iraq al-Manshiya and Faluja. Israeli historian Benny Morris has written that during the 1948-49 Israeli war of independence with Palestinians and their Arab allies, the villages' residents were all expelled in line with Israel's "strategic desire to achieve 'Arab-clear' frontiers."

Intel, whose processors can be found in about 80 percent of the world's computers, has reportedly invested $2.7 billion to upgrade its Kiryat Gat plants where it is working on new chips that will make computers lighter and faster. That brings its total investments in Israel to about $10 billion, and it has also benefited from more than $1 billion in Israeli government grants.

4 of 10

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.