NFL free agent signings: Who got picked up after the draft?

NFL free agent signings: Dozens of undrafted college football players were signed late Saturday and Sunday by NFL teams. The NFL free agent signings help franchises fill out spring and summer training camp rosters.

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Dec 28, 2013; Bronx, NY, USA; Notre Dame Fighting Irish quarterback Tommy Rees (11) throws a pass against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights during the first half of the Pinstripe Bowl at Yankees Stadium. Mandatory Credit: NPStrans TopPic

Once the NFL Draft ended Saturday night, teams stayed busy by signing undrafted college free agents on Sunday.

Some of these free agents have a legitimate shot at making an NFL roster. Others use the time with one NFL team in the spring and summer workouts to audition for another NFL club.

According to NFL.com, among the players signed or agreeing to free agent deals over the weekend, Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees agreed to join the Washington Redskins. Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch is joining the Chicago Bears as a running back.

Florida State running back James Wilder, Jr., son of former NFL player James Wilder, was signed by the Cincinnati Bengals. After drafting former Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel on Thursday, the Cleveland Browns signed South Carolina quarterback Connor Shaw.

Michigan State linebacker Max Bullough was picked up by the Houston Texans. The Indianapolis Colts went out and signed several players, including Miami of Florida basketball player Erik Swoope, who could be a tight end.

Northwestern's Kain Colter, who made a name for himself off the field when Wildcat football players voted on forming a union at the Big Ten school earlier this year, was signed by the Minnesota Vikings.

Notre Dame defensive tackle Mike Golic, Jr., son of former NFL defensive lineman and current ESPN radio co-host Mike Golic, was signed to a free agent deal by the New Orleans Saints.

The Oakland Raiders made a free-agent legacy signing over the weekend when they came to terms with Notre Dame running back George Atkinson III, son of former legendary Raider defensive back George Atkinson.

Across the bay from Oakland, San Francisco signed Stanford linebacker Shayne Skov. And the Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks came to terms with Texas defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat.

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