President Biden orders sweeping vaccine mandate

President Biden mandated Thursday that all employers with more than 100 workers must require them to be vaccinated or test for COVID weekly, a move which will affect 80 million Americans. Republican leaders said Mr. Biden was going too far. 

Andrew Harnik/AP
President Joe Biden announces the new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans at the White House in Washington, Sept. 8, 2021.

In his most forceful pandemic actions and words, President Joe Biden ordered sweeping new federal vaccine requirements for as many as 100 million Americans – private-sector employees as well as health care workers and federal contractors – in an all-out effort to curb the COVID-19 delta variant.

Speaking at the White House Thursday, Mr. Biden sharply criticized the tens of millions of Americans who are not yet vaccinated.

Republican leaders – and some union chiefs, too – said Mr. Biden was going too far in trying to muscle private companies and workers, a certain sign of legal challenges to come. On the other hand, there was praise from the American Medical Association, the National Association of Manufacturers, and the Business Roundtable – though no direct mention of his mandate for private companies.

The expansive rules mandate that all employers with more than 100 workers must require them to be vaccinated or test for the virus weekly, affecting about 80 million Americans. And the roughly 17 million workers at health facilities that receive federal Medicare or Medicaid also will have to be fully vaccinated.

Mr. Biden is also requiring vaccination for employees of the executive branch and contractors who do business with the federal government – with no option to test out. That covers several million more workers.

Mr. Biden announced the new requirements in a Thursday afternoon address from the White House as part of a new “action plan” to address the latest rise in coronavirus cases and the stagnating pace of COVID-19 shots.

In addition to the vaccination requirements, Mr. Biden moved to double federal fines for airline passengers who refuse to wear masks on flights or to maintain face covering requirements on federal property in accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

He announced that the government will work to increase the supply of virus tests, and that the White House has secured concessions from retailers including Walmart, Amazon, and Kroger to sell at-home testing kits at cost beginning this week.

The administration is also sending additional federal support to assist schools in safely operating, including additional funding for testing. And Mr. Biden called for large entertainment venues and arenas to require vaccinations or proof of a negative test for entry.

The requirement for large companies to mandate vaccinations or weekly testing for employees will be enacted through a forthcoming rule from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that carries penalties of $14,000 per violation, an administration official said.

The rule will require that large companies provide paid time off for vaccination.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will extend a vaccination requirement issued earlier this summer – for nursing home staff – to other healthcare settings including hospitals, home-health agencies, and dialysis centers.

Separately, the Department of Health and Human Services will require vaccinations in Head Start Programs, as well as schools run by the Department of Defense and Bureau of Indian Education, affecting about 300,000 employees.

Mr. Biden’s order for executive branch workers and contractors includes exceptions for workers seeking religious or medical exemptions from vaccination, according to press secretary Jen Psaki. Federal workers who don’t comply will be referred to their agencies’ human resources departments for counseling and discipline, to include potential termination.

An AP-NORC poll conducted in August found 55% of Americans in favor of requiring government workers to be fully vaccinated, compared with 21% opposed. Similar majorities also backed vaccine mandates for health care workers, teachers working at K-12 schools, and workers who interact with the public, as at restaurants and stores.

Mr. Biden has encouraged COVID-19 vaccine requirements in settings like schools, workplaces, and university campuses. On Thursday, the Los Angeles Board of Education voted to require all students 12 and older to be fully vaccinated in the nation’s second-largest school district.

Walmart, the nation’s largest private employer, said in late July it was requiring all workers at its headquarters in Bentonville, Arkansas, as well as its managers who travel within the United States, to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 4. But the company had stopped short of requiring shots for its frontline workers.

CVS Health said in late August it would require certain employees who interact with patients to be fully vaccinated by the end of October. That includes nurses, care managers, and pharmacists.

In the government, several federal agencies have previously announced vaccine requirements for much of their staffs, particularly those in healthcare roles like the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Pentagon moved last month to require all service members to get vaccinated. Combined, the White House estimates those requirements cover 2.5 million Americans. Thursday’s order is expected to affect nearly 2 million more federal workers and potentially millions of contractors.

This story was reported by The Associated Press.

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