Women rally across US, urging a vote for change

Thousands of mostly young women rallied Saturday in Washington D.C. and other cities, exhorting voters to oppose President Donald Trump.

Jose Luis Magana/AP
Demonstrators rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington. Dozens of other rallies were planned from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to President Donald Trump and his policies.

Thousands of mostly young women in masks rallied Saturday in the nation’s capital and other American cities, exhorting voters to oppose President Donald Trump and his fellow Republican candidates in the Nov. 3 elections.

The latest of rallies that began with a massive women’s march the day after Mr. Trump’s January 2017 inauguration was playing out during the coronavirus pandemic, and demonstrators were asked to wear face coverings and practice social distancing.

Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, opened the event by asking people to keep their distance from one another, saying that the only superspreader event would be the recent one at the White House.

She talked about the power of women to end Mr. Trump’s presidency.

“His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” she said.

“Vote for your daughter’s future,” read one message in the sea of signs carried by demonstrators. “Fight like a girl,” said another.

Dozens of other rallies were planned from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to Mr. Trump and his policies, especially the push to fill the seat of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day.

One march was held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, outside the dormitory where Justice Ginsburg lived as an undergraduate student.

In New York, a demonstrator wearing a Donald Trump mask stood next to a statue of George Washington at Federal Hall during the the women’s march outside the New York Stock Exchange.

“We Dissent,” said a cardboard sign carried by a young woman wearing a red mask with small portraits of the liberal Supreme Court justice whose Sept. 18 death sparked the rush by Republicans to replace her with a conservative.

In Washington, the demonstrators started with a rally at Freedom Plaza, then marched toward Capitol Hill, finishing in front of the Supreme Court, where they were met by a handful of anti-abortion activists.

In one of several speeches at the rally, Sonja Spoo, director of reproductive rights campaigns at Ultraviolet, said she has to chuckle when she hears reporters ask Ms. Trump whether he will accept a peaceful transfer of power if he loses his reelection bid.

“When we vote him out, come Nov. 3, there is no choice,” said Ms. Spoo. “Donald Trump will not get to choose whether he stays in power.”

“That is not his power, that is our power,” she said.

This story was reported by The Associated Press.

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