Putin, Trump speak by phone, aim for cooperation -Kremlin

The two men will maintain contact by phone and seek to meet each other in person, a Trump campaign statement said.

AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko
FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, file photo, a journalist points at a portrait of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, with a portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin during a live telecast of the U.S. presidential election in the Union Jack pub in Moscow, Russia. Putin's spokesman Peskov said Thursday that one way Trump could help build confidence with Russia after he becomes president would be to persuade NATO to slow down its expansion or withdraw its forces from Russia's borders.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on Monday agreed to work towards "constructive cooperation," including on fighting terrorism, the Kremlin said.

In their first phone call since Trump won the Nov. 8 election, they agreed to "channel" relations between Russia and the United States and "combine efforts to tackle international terrorism and extremism."

"The importance of creating a solid basis for bilateral ties was underscored, in particularly by developing the trade-economic component," the Kremlin said in its statement.

It added that the countries should "return to pragmatic, mutually beneficial cooperation, which would address the interests of both countries as well as stability and safety the world over."

Trump's team issued a statement saying Putin called to offer congratulations. The statement said Trump told Putin he was looking forward to a strong and enduring relationship with Russia and its people.

The two men will maintain contact by phone and seek to meet each other in person, the statement said.

Trump will succeed President Barack Obama on Jan. 20. Obama's relations withPutin have become tense over issues that include Syria and Ukraine.

 

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