Hillary Clinton riding high in latest poll

Hillary Rodham Clinton has a commanding lead over her nearest Democratic challenger, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, in a new poll. 

REUTERS/Kate Munsch :
Pastor Traci Blackmon (L) talks with Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a community meeting at Christ the King United Church of Christ in Florissant, Missouri June 23, 2015.

Hillary Rodham Clinton is on track to become the first woman president of America, according to a WallStreet Journal/NBC News poll

The poll was taken earlier this month in the days following Mrs. Clinton’s first official campaign rally. The results show that she is favored to win both the Democratic primary and the 2016 presidential election.

Three-quarters of Democratic primary voters said Clinton was their top pick to win the primary.

Her closest Democratic rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders got just 15 percent in the poll.  Former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley were picked by less than 5 percent of respondents.

Ninety-two percent of Democratic primary voters said they could see themselves supporting Clinton. 

Politico reported:

The results represent a resurgence of sorts for Clinton after Sanders had appeared to close the gap slightly in recent months, though it should be noted that the poll was of American adults, not of registered or likely voters — and that polling averages are usually a better indicator of the true state of the race.

The poll also indicated that Clinton’s predicted success goes beyond just the Democratic nomination.

Out of the 1,000 likely voters polled on their opinions of potential presidential candidates from both parties, Clinton polled at 48 percent to 40 percent against the leading Republican contender, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. 

She polled at 50 percent against 40 percent against Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and 51 percent to 37 percent against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. 

“The poll underscores Clinton’s strength as a candidate, both among Democrats and key constituencies that could tip the balance in a general election. But the results also show a clear desire among Democratic voters for a rival to emerge and hint at potential cracks in her support,” the Wall Street Journal said

Among Republican primary voters polled, Bush took the lead with 22 percent of the vote. Walker and Rubio came in second and third with 17 percent and 14 percent, respectively. 

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson was polled at 11 percent, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee at 9 percent, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul at 7 percent, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry at 5 percent, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz each at 4 percent. 

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