Man arrested for plotting attack on Congress

An Ohio man name Christopher Lee Cornell was arrested Wednesday for allegedly planning to attack the Capitol. Cornell spoke of his desire to support the Islamic State. 

A man who plotted to attack the U.S. congressional building and kill government officials inside it and spoke of his desire to support the Islamic State group was arrested on Wednesday, the FBI said.

A criminal complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Ohio charges Christopher Lee Cornell with attempting to kill officers and employees of the United States.

Cornell, also known as Raheel Mahrus Ubaydah, was arrested as he took control of a firearm during an undercover FBI operation in Ohio, the FBI said. The public was never in danger in the investigation, said John Barrios, acting special agent in charge of the FBI's Cincinnati division.

A phone message and an email were left Wednesday for attorney Karen Savir, a federal public defender listed in court records as Cornell's attorney. A working phone number could not be found for Cornell's family members.

The complaint alleges that an FBI informant began supplying agents with information about Cornell last year. The informant and Cornell, 20, first began communicating through Twitter in August 2014 and then through an instant messaging platform separate from Twitter, according to the complaint.

"I believe we should meet up and make our own group in alliance with the Islamic State here and plan operations ourselves," Cornell wrote in an instant message, according to the court document.

The Islamic State militant organization, which broke with the al-Qaida network and took control of large parts of Iraq and Syria, has drawn jihadi fighters from across the Muslim world and Europe. It has been blamed for violence such as the beheadings of foreign captives including a former U.S. soldier turned aid worker and two American journalists.

The two met in person in October in Cincinnati and again in November, the complaint states. Cornell told the informant at the November meeting that he considered the members of Congress as enemies and that he intended to conduct an attack on the Capitol, according to the complaint. The document says Cornell discussed his plan for them to travel to Washington and conduct reconnaissance of the security of government buildings including the Capitol before executing "a plan of attack."

Cornell planned for the two to detonate pipe bombs at and near the Capitol and then shoot and kill employees and officials, and Cornell had saved money to fund the attack, according to the complaint.

Cornell was arrested after buying two semi-automatic rifles and about 600 rounds of ammunition, authorities said.

On Tuesday, authorities revealed an Ohio bartender had been charged with threatening to kill House Speaker John Boehner at a country club near his home. Boehner, a Republican, returned to the Capitol on Wednesday without commenting to reporters. But a Boehner spokesman, Michael Steel, said, "Once again, the entire Congress owes a debt of gratitude to the FBI and all those who keep us safe."

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