Harry Reid breaks ribs, facial bones in exercise accident

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid fell in his Nevada home Thursday when a piece of exercise equipment broke, causing him to break several ribs and facial bones. The Senate minority leader plans to return to Washington this week.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid broke several ribs and facial bones when a piece of exercise equipment snapped at his Nevada home Thursday, causing the lawmaker to fall.

In a statement issued Friday, Reid's office said the 75-year-old senator was hospitalized overnight at University Medical Center in Las Vegas as a precaution and was released on Friday. His security detail had initially taken Reidto St. Rose Dominican Hospital near his home in Henderson, Nevada.

The accident happened when an elastic exercise band broke, striking Reid in the face and causing him to fall, said spokesman Adam Jentleson. Reid struck some equipment as he fell, breaking multiple bones near his right eye.

As he hit the floor, he broke several ribs, Jentleson said.

Tests found no internal bleeding, Jentleson said, and his vision should not be affected.

"Senator Reid will return to Washington this weekend and be in the office Tuesday as the Senate prepares to reconvene," his office said. "His doctors expect a full recovery."

Jentleson said Reid is likely to have severe facial bruises.

President Barack Obama, vacationing in Hawaii, phoned Reid on Friday to wish him well, the White House said.

Reid, majority leader since 2007, will hand over the top job in the Senate next week to Republican Mitch McConnell of Kentucky after Democrats lost their majority in November's midterm elections. Reid faces a potentially tough re-election campaign in 2016.

In May 2011, Reid dislocated a shoulder and suffered a contusion above his left eye when he slipped after an early morning run in the rain. He fell when he leaned against a parked car.

In October 2012, Reid suffered rib and hip contusions in a chain-reaction car crash.

Reid has run marathons and was a boxer as a young man.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.