Abducted nurse from Philadelphia found safe

Carlesha Freeland-Gaither, who was seen on surveillance video being abducted in Philadelphia, was rescued Wednesday after being spotted in Jessup, Maryland, in a car with a man police now have in custody. 

A woman seen on surveillance video being abducted off a Philadelphia street was found safe outside Baltimore on Wednesday, and the man who snatched her was arrested, police said.

Carlesha Freeland-Gaither was spotted in Jessup, Maryland, in a car with the man and was rescued soon after, police said, without going into details. The man was nabbed after he stepped out of the car, they said.

"We got a very dangerous predator off the street," police Chief Charles Ramsey said.

Freeland-Gaither, who had some minor injuries, was generally doing OK, police said. There was no indication she and the man, who used to live in Philadelphia, knew each other, authorities said.

Philadelphia's police commissioner credits an abducted woman's fighting spirit with helping to save her life. Charles Ramsey told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Thursday that Carlesha Freeland-Gaither kept struggling with her captor despite being bound.

Ramsey said Thursday the 22-year-old nursing assistant's resistance, "probably helped keep her alive."

The man, Delven Barnes, was being held Wednesday night on an unrelated Virginia warrant alleging attempted capital murder, assault and malicious injury with acid, explosives or fire, and he would face federal charges in the Philadelphia abduction, authorities said. Barnes, 37, couldn't be reached for comment while in custody.

Freeland-Gaither's mother, Keisha Gaither, thanked police and the community for their support and said she had talked to her by phone but hadn't seen her yet. Keisha Gaither said her daughter was distraught when they talked.

"She was very upset. She was crying. She just was asking for me, to tell me she loved me, she missed me, to come get her," she said. "I'm going to get my daughter. I'm going to get my baby."

Freeland-Gaither, 22, had been last seen on surveillance video being grabbed by a man and pulled toward a car Sunday night as she struggled to get away inPhiladelphia's Germantown neighborhood.

Police and federal authorities had released a stream of images over the past two days from surveillance cameras in Maryland and from a Philadelphiasupermarket hours before the abduction.

The video showed a man in a knit cap and dark coat walking down an aisle of a store and using a self-checkout station. A timestamp indicates the video was recorded eight hours before Freeland-Gaither disappeared.

A witness called 911 at about 9:40 p.m. Sunday and reported seeing a woman identified as Freeland-Gaither screaming for help as she was forced into a dark gray four-door vehicle.

Police said Freeland-Gaither's glasses and cellphone were dropped on the street, near piles of broken auto glass.

The witness said Freeland-Gaither — described by her parents as easygoing until she's threatened — broke the car's rear side windows before the vehicle sped off.

Freeland-Gaither, a nursing assistant, graduated from high school in Maryland and lived with her grandfather in Philadelphia until a couple of months ago, when she moved in with her boyfriend.

Her grandmother Ana Mulero said she has worked with cancer patients and has been pursuing a career in nursing.

Freeland-Gaither's parents circulated fliers in Germantown, and Facebook groups sprung up with prayers for her safe return.

Associated Press writers Sean Carlin and Ron Todt contributed to this report.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.