Recovered from Ebola, Dallas nurse reunites with her dog

Nina Pham, a Dallas nurse who recovered from Ebola has been reunited with her dog, a King Charles Spaniel named Bentley, who was quarantined for 21 days.

A Dallas nurse who recovered from Ebola has been reunited with her dog named Bentley, who has been quarantined since she fell ill.

Nina Pham and the King Charles Spaniel were reunited privately on Saturday in a vacant residence where officers once lived at a decommissioned naval air base, where he was quarantined for 21 days. Veterinarians in full personal protective gear checked on him daily.

"I'd like to take a moment to thank people from all around the world who have sent their best wishes and prayers to me and Mr. Bentley," said Pham, who read a statement at a news conference Saturday. Bentley, whom she called "one of my best friends," was there on a leash.

Pham was diagnosed with Ebola last month. She contracted the virus while caring for a Liberian man, Thomas Eric Duncan, who died Oct. 8.

Pham recovered and was released Oct. 24 from a Washington, D.C.-area hospital.

Earlier this year, authorities in Madrid, Spain, caused a public uproar when they euthanized a dog belonging to a nursing assistant sickened by Ebola.

"Bentley is alive and well in the city of Dallas," Mayor Mike Rawlings said, adding that he even kissed the dog Saturday. "There were a lot of human beings that spent a lot of time making sure this dog was safe."

Rawlings thanked city staff and Texas A&M University veterinarians.

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