Shots fired, one student injured at Kentucky high school, police say

A Kentucky high school student was injured and one person was being sought after a shooting at a school in southern Louisville on Tuesday. 'It appears it is an isolated incident that happened just inside the school,' police said.

A high school student was injured and one person was being sought after a shooting at a high school in southern Louisville, police said Tuesday.

The student had non-life threatening injuries and was reunited with parents at University Hospital, Officer Phil Russell said. He didn't say if the injured student and shooter knew each other or if the shooter was a student at Fern Creek Traditional High School.

Russell said the suspect left the 1,400-student school immediately after firing the shot.

"It appears it is an isolated incident that happened just inside the school," Russell said. "Obviously a large crime scene, but it was isolated to just inside the building."

Video from television stations showed police escorting students with their hands over their heads out of the school in the southern part of the city to a nearby softball field.

Police cars surrounded the 91-year-old school.

Jefferson County Public Schools spokesman Ben Jackey said the school went into lockdown with students put in classrooms. After police arrived, students were led out before being taken to a nearby park for dismissal.

Students at a nearby elementary school with a later dismissal were restricted to their building, Jackey said.

"This is senseless. This is unacceptable," Jackey said. "This cannot happen in our school. This is not the type of things students should be exposed to."

The school, which opened in 1923, concentrates on communications, media and arts. It has a student-run radio station, WFHS.

Earlier Tuesday, a student was shot by a fellow student outside a North Carolina high school just minutes before classes began, and the suspect then waited for police to arrive, authorities said.

The shooting happened around 7:40 a.m. as the two male students argued in an on-campus courtyard at Albemarle High School, Albemarle Police Chief William Halliburton said at a news conference.

The shooter put down his gun after firing two shots, walked into the principal's office and waited for police, Halliburton said.

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Associated Press writer Brett Barrouquere contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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