Oklahoma wildfire kills one, and 150 homes are in fire path

Oklahoma wildfire: 1,000 evacuated from homes near Guthrie, Okla., where a wildfire was spread by high winds on Monday. The fire chief says the wildfire is 75 percent contained.

Firefighters facing another hot and windy forecast worked Monday to battle a large wildfire in central Oklahoma that destroyed at least six homes and left one person dead after a controlled burn spread out of control.

The wildfire broke out Sunday afternoon near Guthrie and by 9 p.m. had burned an estimated 4 to 6 square miles of land as well as several homes, Guthrie Fire Department Chief Eric Harlow said. The fire was still burning Monday and threatening about 150 additional homes; Harlow said the blaze was about 75 percent contained.

Temperatures later Monday were expected to hit 100 degrees, with winds gusting from the south at 33 mph. Tuesday's winds were expected to be higher still, enhancing the chance that the fire could spread more.

"It's not that big ... but the potential is there," said Capt. Stan May of the Oklahoma Incident Management Team. He said two Black Hawk UH-60 helicopters from the Army National Guard were being sent in to help put water on the fire, with a third on standby.

Rains last week had left emergency crews hopeful that the fire danger would be reduced, but Sunday's fire "managed to slip by us," May said.

Insurance Commissioner John Doak, who had planned to tour the area Monday, had to wait until the fire was more under control, spokeswoman Kesha Keith said.

The Guthrie Fire Department said six homes were destroyed and that the number of damaged or destroyed homes was expected to rise Monday. Fire department crews assessed the fire and damage by helicopter at daybreak Monday.

Tabitha Diamond, who lives a few miles from Guthrie, told KOCO-TV that she was returning from a music festival in Noble when she saw the flames and sped home. The fire missed her place but destroyed a nearby trailer home.

"It didn't get close enough, but it got too close," she said.

The American Red Cross set up a shelter at a church in Guthrie for those affected by the fire.

Winds are expected to gust to 36 mph and reach 39 mph Wednesday, the National Weather Service said. The next forecast of rain is for Wednesday.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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