Steubenville update: Ohio high school rape convict released

Steuvenville High School student Ma'Lik Richmond was released Monday. He had been sentenced to one year in March 2013, after he and Trent Mays were convicted of raping an unconscious girl in August 2012.

Keith Srakocic/Pool/AP/File
Ma'lik Richmond (c.) stands with his father, Nathaniel Richmond (l.) and attorney Walter Madison after he and co-defendant Trent Mays were convicted of rape and other charges in juvenile court in Steubenville, Ohio, March 17, 2013. Ma'lik Richmond was released from the juvenile detention center Monday, less than a year after his conviction for raping an unconscious 16-year-old girl.

A former eastern Ohio high school football player has been released from a juvenile detention center less than a year after his conviction for raping a 16-year-old girl following an alcohol-fueled party.

WTOV-TV in Steubenville reported Sunday evening that Ma'Lik Richmond had been released. His attorney, Walter Madison, issued a statement saying the youth is "braced for the balance of his life" and that he and his family are requesting privacy.

"While away, Ma'Lik has reflected, learned, matured, and grown in many ways," he said in the statement. "He is a better, stronger person and looks forward to school, life, and spending time with family."

Richmond was sentenced to one year in March 2013. A judge convicted him and fellow Steubenville High School student athlete Trent Mays of raping the West Virginia girl in August 2012. Mays also was convicted of using his phone to take a naked picture of the underage girl. He was sentenced to two years.

Asked for comment, the attorney for the girl, Bob Fitzsimmons, said in a statement Monday it was "disheartening" that there was no mention of her or her family in the statement made on Richmond's behalf.

"One would expect to see the defendant publicly apologize for all the pain he caused rather than make statements about himself," Fitzsimmons said. "Rape is about victims, not defendants."

Madison didn't immediately respond to messages from The Associated Press seeking comment. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's office said he had no comment on Richmond.

Jefferson County Judge Thomas Lipps last August gave Richmond Ohio's second-toughest sex offender classification, the same as Mays had received. Richmond must register as a sex offender every six months for 20 years. However, he can request to have the classification removed later based on rehabilitation history, and his name won't be included on publicly accessible websites. Richmond was 16 at the time of the rape.

The case drew wide attention amid allegations of a cover-up to protect the celebrated Steubenville High School football team.

DeWine convened a grand jury last year to look into possible related crimes, resulting in charges against six people. The Steubenville school district's former technology director faces a late February trial on charges he misled investigators. He and other school officials charged have pleaded not guilty.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Steubenville update: Ohio high school rape convict released
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0106/Steubenville-update-Ohio-high-school-rape-convict-released
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe